Schedule Change Request Policy & Procedures

If you would like to request a schedule change you must complete a Schedule Change Request Form which can be obtained in the College/Career Counseling Office. It must include:

  • your signature
  • your parent/guardian’s signature
  • and your teacher’s signature (for academic courses only).

Submit the completed form to Mrs. Crace in Room 32.

* Students may only request schedule changes the first 2 weeks of each semester. Any schedule changes received after the second week will not be processed.

Schedule Change Requests Must be for the Following Reasons:

  • course needed for graduation
  • wrong level course
  • need credit recovery
  • and course already taken/passed (proof of grade must be provided).

2020-21 Upper School (Grades 7-12) Course Catalog

Non-Discriminatory Statement 

All students are ensured an equal opportunity for admission in and access to the educational and co-curricular programs. Temecula Preparatory School policies, procedures, and practices ensure that there is no discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender (including sexual harassment), physical or mental disabilities. This is in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1975. The lack of English language skills will not be a barrier for admission and participation in any program. All students have equal education facilities and evaluation procedures, and there shall be equal allocations of vocational education funds. This nondiscrimination policy covers admission and access to, and treatment and employment in, all the Vocational Education Programs and activities.

History and Social Science

History 7 covers the time period from 1200 through the Gold Rush, with special attention given to the Revolutionary War and the Founding Fathers.  Geography will be tied into the historical time period, making the information more relevant and building understanding of the world.

History 8 covers the era of modern history, including material from the American Civil War through the late 20th century, with an emphasis on American history and the major wars.  Geography will be tied into the historical time period, making the information more relevant and building understanding of the world.

 

This course is an in-depth study of Europe during ancient times and the Middle Ages.  Course content focuses on ancient Greece and Rome, and progresses through major events, personages and institutions of Europe in the High Middle Ages.  The goal of West Civ I is for students to understand how Europe and the West laid the foundation for the Modern Era.  Emphasis will be placed on economic, social, and political forces within society, and how factors such as geography, religion, disease, governments, war, etc. impacted the Western world.  While much of the curriculum is taken from the textbook, students will also work frequently with primary sources from influential writers, artists, politicians, and philosophers who lived during the time periods under study.

 

This course is an in-depth study of Western civilization from the early Modern Era into post-war 20th Century.  The goal of West Civ II is for students to understand the influence European society had on the development of the Modern world.  Emphasis will be placed on economic, social, and political forces within society, and how factors such as industrialism, imperialism, world wars, and political theories impacted society in the West and around the world.  While much of the curriculum is taken from the textbook, students will also work frequently with primary sources from influential writers, artists, politicians, and philosophers who lived during the time periods under study.

 

This course will survey American History from the Colonial Era to the Modern Era. Analysis of original source documents will be used to examine the cultural, political, economic, social, and diplomatic history of America. History themes are analytically discussed, developing generalizations based on historical fact, in order to interpret and apply history. At the rhetoric stage of the trivium, the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of informed judgment are continuously developed. Furthermore it is taught to articulate reasons and evidence, clearly and persuasively, in spoken and written forms.

Prerequisite:  Grade of B or better in previous History class.

 

AP US History takes an in-depth look at the uniqueness of American history and culture.  It is taught on a college level using college texts.  It deals critically with the problems and materials in US history; and develops the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment in order to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively.

This course will deepen understanding and appreciation of the institutions of American government.  It includes a thorough examination of the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and the current state of the Legislative, Executive, and Judiciary branches of US government. Emphasis will be placed on increasing civic literacy as preparation for voting and participation as adults in American society becomes eminent.

 

This course explores the major components of our economic system.  It includes analysis of the roles individuals, public and private organizations, and government play in our economy.  Additionally, it is designed to develop various life-skills in areas of education, employment, and personal finance, all of which are crucial for personal and professional success in American

English

English 7 is a course that emphasizes literary analysis and writing.  The content of the course focuses upon the study of various classical titles whose plots revolve around the time period of 1600-1850.  The integration of novels relevant to seventh grade historical studies will further enhance analytic and critical thinking skills as connections are made to themes evident throughout past and present history.  The course involves “close reading” of literature, grammar work, vocabulary building, extensive weekly reading assignments, and formal essay writing.   This course will develop essential literary conventions including plot analysis, character development, and evaluation of major literary themes.  This course will also develop foundations for essential writing conventions including MLA formatting, organization, and style.

English 8 is a course that emphasizes literary analysis and both expository and persuasive writing. The content of the course focuses upon the study of various classical titles whose plots revolve around the time period of 1850-Modern Day.  The integration of novels relevant to the eighth grade historical studies will further enhance the analytic and critical thinking skills as connection are made to themes evident throughout past and present history.  The course involves “close reading” of literature, grammar, extensive weekly reading assignments, and formal expository and persuasive essays.  This course will develop essential literary conventions including plot analysis, character development, and evaluation of major literary themes.  This course will also develop essential writing conventions including MLA formatting, organization, and style.

Classical Literature is a course that emphasizes literary analysis and narrative, persuasive, and comparative writing. This course is an introduction to higher-level English with an emphasis on Ancient Greek and Roman literature which coincides with the timeline of the Western Civilization I course. The course focuses on Classical literary works that highlight various themes, structural elements, and cultural references.  Students will utilize the Classic texts and historical timeline to obtain a better understanding of underlying literary truths.

 

World Literature and Composition is a continuation of higher-level English with an emphasis on works which coincide with the timeline of the Western Civilization II course. The course will examine the history and development of the English language. Literary analysis, comparison, persuasive, writings are used to highlight various themes, structural elements, and cultural references. “Close readings” will take place where facts and details are observed in order to enhance understanding of the literature.

Prerequisite:  Grade of B or better in previous English course, Instructor Approval, and completion of summer assignment.

AP English Literature and Composition delves into a wealth of World Literature including novels, plays, and poetry. This course focuses on AP-level passage analysis. The writing is based upon analyzing literary elements in both prose and poetry to produce thoughtful arguments about the author’s purpose in context of a given time period. “Close readings” of the literature and Socratic discussions are used to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the authors, their works, their message, and their writing style.

American Literature and Composition utilizes novels, short stories, plays, and poetry from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century. The literature is studied in conjunction with the historical time period the U.S. History course. The writing focuses on argument and literary analysis. “Close readings” of the literature and Socratic discussions are used to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the authors, their works, and their messages.

Prerequisite:  Grade of B or better in previous English course, Instructor Approval, and completion of summer assignment.

AP English Language and Composition covers American Literature from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century using novels, short stories, non-fiction essays, plays, and poetry. The literature is studied in conjunction with the historical time period covered in AP US History and devotes much of the year to analyzing AP level non-fiction passages. The writing is based upon formulating an argument, analyzing rhetorical strategies, and synthesizing information. “Close readings” of the literature and Socratic discussions are used to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the authors, their works, their message, and their writing style.

Modern Literature and Composition covers novels, plays, and poetry from the nineteenth century to the twentieth century.  “Close readings” of the literature will be used in order to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the authors, their works and their messages.  The writing focuses on persuasion and literary analysis.  Engagement in Socratic discussions regarding arguable, thought-provoking questions will lead to further inquiry to discover the deeper meaning of each unit.

 

Prerequisite:  Grade of B or better in previous English course, Instructor Approval, and completion of summer assignment.

AP English Literature and Composition covers Modern Literature from the nineteenth century to the present century using novels, plays, and poetry. This course focuses on AP-level passage analysis. The writing is based upon analyzing literary elements in both prose and poetry to produce thoughtful arguments about the author’s purpose in context of a given time period. “Close readings” of the literature and Socratic discussions are used to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the authors, their works, their message, and their writing style.

Mathematics

This is a challenging course designed to set the road to success in Algebra I.  Topics explored will include algebraic expressions, integers, equations, decimals, fractions, ratios, proportions, percentages, area, volume, and probability.  Critical-thinking and problem-solving skills will be developed and well-established during this course.

Prerequisite: Algebra Readiness Assessment (passing score) or instructor’s approval.

Symbolic reasoning and calculations with symbols are central in algebra.  Algebra I develops an understanding of the symbolic language of mathematics and the sciences.  In addition, algebraic skills and concepts are developed and used in a wide variety of problem-solving situations.

Prerequisite:   Successful completion of Algebra I and passing score on Algebra Exit Exam.

 

This course will develop essential mathematical skills including:  the language of plane geometry, angles, polygons and polyhedrons, transformations, triangles and inequalities, congruent triangles, parallel lines, properties of quadrilaterals, perimeter and area, similarity, similar triangles, right triangles, circles, area and volume of polyhedrons, and introduction to trigonometry. In addition to learning these skills and concepts, students will learn to construct formal, logical arguments and proofs.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry and passing score on Algebra Exit Exam.

           

This course will develop essential mathematical skills in the following areas: properties of numbers, operations on numbers and order of operations, linear equations and inequalities, graphs of inequalities, absolute value equations and problem solving, variation linear equations, graphs of linear equations in two and three variables, systems of inequalities, polynomials and factoring quadratic equations, solving rational expressions and equations with imaginary and complex numbers with graphing, conic functions with graphing, and exponential, trigonometric and logarithmic functions.

Prerequisite:   B or better in Algebra II.

 

This course will develop essential mathematical skills in the following areas: solving rational expressions and equations with imaginary and complex numbers with graphing, conic functions with graphing, the use and graphs of functions of different types (exponential, trigonometric, logarithmic, polynomial, reciprocal, polynomial, radical), logical reasoning, applications of geometry, statistics, limits, and convergent and divergent series.  Since the application of the material is what we are most interested in, word problems will be visited frequently.

Prerequisite:   B or better in Pre-Calculus and Instructor’s approval.

AP Calculus is a rigorous college-prep course that will explore such topics as (but not limited to) finite and infinite limits, the development of a derivative, tangent lines, rules of differentiation, area under curves, hyperbolic functions, slope fields and simple differential equations, integration rules, volumes of curved objects, arc length, center of mass, L’Hopital’s Rule, and improper integrals.  Since the application of the material is what we are most interested in, word problems will be used frequently. Students enrolled in this course should have the goal of taking the advanced placement test in May.

 

Note: If you are considering a major in the fields of mathematics, physics, engineering, or applied science this course may be required.  Consult specific college of interest for exact requirements.

Prerequisite:   B or better in AP Calculus AB and Instructor’s approval.

AP Calculus BC will be a continuation of AB Calculus Period. This course will review the major concepts from Calculus AB and then continue on with the additional calculus concepts covered under the BC curriculum.  New topics of study will include parametric, polar and vector functions as well as polynomial approximations and series.

 

Note: If you are considering a major in the fields of mathematics, physics, engineering, or applied science this course may be required.  Consult specific college of interest for exact requirements.

 

Prerequisite:  Successful Completion of Algebra II

 

This course covers the basic principles of descriptive statistics, exploratory data analysis, design of experiments, probability, sampling distributions and estimation, and fitting models to data. The course also looks extensively at the principles of hypothesis testing and statistical inference. Measuring the probability of an event, interpreting probability, and using probability in decision-making are central themes of this course. Data sets from games of chance, business, medicine, policy making, and the natural and social sciences will be explored. This course has a strong visual/graphical emphasis, based on the premise that students learn best by “doing.” The primary emphases of this course are critical thinking and the educated interpretation of results.

 

Prerequisite: B or better in Algebra II and Instructor’s approval.

The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: Exploratory Analysis, Planning a Study, Probability, and Statistical Inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.

 

Note: Students enrolled in this course should have the goal of taking the advanced placement test in May. If you are considering a major in the fields of business, nursing, psychology, political science, or other sciences, this course may be required.  Consult specific college of interest for exact requirements.

Lab Science

Science 7 focuses on life science. Life science provides an introduction to Biology and focuses on all living things and the way that they change over time. Some of the topics studied will lend themselves nicely to hands on activities.

 

Science 8 focuses on physical science. Physical science provides an introduction to both Chemistry and Physics and focuses on motion, forces, density and buoyancy, structure of matter, reactions, the Periodic Table, and the Solar System. Some of these topics will lend themselves nicely to hands-on activities.

CP Biology is a yearlong college preparatory course that fulfills both high school graduation and UC college admission requirements as a lab science. CP Biology is a rigorous course that meets the California State standards in biology. The course offers a challenging curriculum that requires the use critical thinking, investigation, writing, and technology skills that have practical applications across the curriculum.  CP Biology blends the classical model of analysis, logic, and rhetoric with the current issues in science. This course lays the foundation for continued study in chemistry and other science courses. 

PrerequisiteJunior or senior standing only.  Successful completion of one year of the following courses: Biology or Honors Biology with a “B+” or better and Chemistry with a “B+” or better.

 

AP Biology is a yearlong course that is graded on a 5 point scale. It is designed to be taken after the successful completion of both high school Biology and Chemistry. AP Biology includes topics regularly covered in a college introductory biology course such as the process of evolution driving the diversity and unity of life; biological systems utilizing free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, reproduce, and maintain dynamic homeostasis; living systems storing, retrieving, transmitting, and responding to information essential to life processes; and biological systems interacting.  AP Biology aims to provide the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.  Taking the AP Biology Exam is recommended at the end of the year.

Pre-requisite:  Successful completion of Biology or Honors Biology and Algebra I; Junior/Senior standing preferred.

 

Anatomy and Physiology is a yearlong college preparatory course that deals with the structure and function of the human body and the mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis within it. Various topics and terms associated with the study of physiology will be examined including the study of fluid; cells and tissues; and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

 

 

 

Chemistry – 98433                  

Prerequisites:  Some topics in Chemistry, especially those covered in the second semester, require a good understanding of the principles taught in Algebra I.  Students should have completed Algebra I with a grade of C + or better.

 

Chemistry is the study of the properties of matter and energy.  This course is a laboratory-based, college preparatory science course.  It utilizes a combination of laboratories, activities, discussions, technology, lectures, demonstrations and other visual aids to give students a solid background in a broad representation of chemistry topics.  The topics covered in this course are consistent with the California State Standards and include:  Atoms, Isotopes, Ions, Chemical Bonding, Chemical Reactions, Stoichiometry, Gases, Thermodynamics, Solutions, Acids and Bases, Reaction Kinetics, Nuclear Chemistry, and Organic Chemistry.  The course fulfills the physical science requirement for high school graduation and is an A-G course recommended for admission to the University of California.

 

AP Chemistry – 31010

Prerequisites:  Students should have completed Chemistry with a grade of B+ or better.  AP Chemistry has a stronger mathematical component than standard Chemistry and requires a thorough understanding of the principles of Algebra.  Students should have completed Algebra I with a grade of B or better and concurrent or prior enrollment in Algebra II is highly recommended.

 

Chemistry is the study of the properties of matter and energy.  AP Chemistry is similar in format and content to a first-year college-level Chemistry course.  It is a rigorous course with a strong laboratory component and utilizes a combination of laboratories, activities, discussions, technology, lectures, demonstrations and other visual aids to give students a solid background in a broad representation of advanced chemistry topics.  Topics covered include:  Atoms, Quantum Mechanics, Chemical Bonding, Stoichiometry, Gases, Aqueous Solutions, Equilibrium, Thermodynamics, Chemical Kinetics, Electrochemistry, and Organic Chemistry.  Upon completion of the course, students are encouraged to take the AP Chemistry examination administered by the College Board.  Performance on that exam as well as the student’s portfolio of laboratory reports will be considered by the college or university in awarding A.P. credit. 

 

AP Chemistry is currently offered only in odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites:  Some topics in Chemistry, especially those covered in the second semester, require a good understanding of the principles taught in Algebra I.  Students should have completed Algebra I with a grade of C + or better.

 

Chemistry is the study of the properties of matter and energy.  This course is a laboratory-based, college preparatory science course.  It utilizes a combination of laboratories, activities, discussions, technology, lectures, demonstrations and other visual aids to give students a solid background in a broad representation of chemistry topics.  The topics covered in this course are consistent with the California State Standards and include:  Atoms, Isotopes, Ions, Chemical Bonding, Chemical Reactions, Stoichiometry, Gases, Thermodynamics, Solutions, Acids and Bases, Reaction Kinetics, Nuclear Chemistry, and Organic Chemistry.  The course fulfills the physical science requirement for high school graduation and is an A-G course recommended for admission to the University of California.

Prerequisites:  Students should have completed Chemistry with a grade of B+ or better.  AP Chemistry has a stronger mathematical component than standard Chemistry and requires a thorough understanding of the principles of Algebra.  Students should have completed Algebra I with a grade of B or better and concurrent or prior enrollment in Algebra II is highly recommended.

 

Chemistry is the study of the properties of matter and energy.  AP Chemistry is similar in format and content to a first-year college-level Chemistry course.  It is a rigorous course with a strong laboratory component and utilizes a combination of laboratories, activities, discussions, technology, lectures, demonstrations and other visual aids to give students a solid background in a broad representation of advanced chemistry topics.  Topics covered include:  Atoms, Quantum Mechanics, Chemical Bonding, Stoichiometry, Gases, Aqueous Solutions, Equilibrium, Thermodynamics, Chemical Kinetics, Electrochemistry, and Organic Chemistry.  Upon completion of the course, students are encouraged to take the AP Chemistry examination administered by the College Board.  Performance on that exam as well as the student’s portfolio of laboratory reports will be considered by the college or university in awarding A.P. credit. 

 

AP Chemistry is currently offered only in odd-numbered years.

Honors Physics relies heavily on the tools of mathematics, and strong math skills are required for success in the course.  Students should have completed Algebra I and Geometry with grades of B – or better.  Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry is strongly recommended.

Physics is the study of the motion of objects and energy.  The Honors Physics course at Temecula Preparatory School is a rigorous laboratory-based, college preparatory science course.  It utilizes a combination of laboratories, activities, discussions, technology, lectures, demonstrations and other visual aids to give students a solid background in a broad representation of physics topics.  The topics covered in this course are consistent with the California State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards and include:  Motion, Force, Momentum, Energy, Gravity, Circular Motion, Waves, Electricity, Magnetism, Thermodynamics, and Optics.  The course fulfills the physical science requirement for high school graduation and is an A through G laboratory science course recommended for admission to the University of California.

Prerequisites:   AP Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary course.  Students should have completed Biology and Chemistry with grades of B+ or better.

 

The AP Environmental Science course is similar in format and content to an introductory college-level Environmental Science course.  It provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships in the natural world.  It is a rigorous course involving strong laboratory and field investigation components and utilizes a combination of activities, discussions, technology, lectures, demonstrations and other visual aids to give students a solid background in a broad representation of environmental science topics.  Topics covered include:  Human Populations, Terrestrial Ecology, Aquatic Ecology, Biodiversity and Endangered Species, Non-Renewable Resources and Energy, Soil, Pest Management and Toxicology, Waste Management, Water Pollution and Sewage, and Air and the Atmosphere.  Upon completion of the course, students are encouraged to take the AP Environmental Science examination administered by the College Board.  Performance on that exam as well as the student’s portfolio of laboratory reports will be considered by the college or university in awarding AP credit. 

 

AP Environmental Science is currently offered only in even-numbered years.

 

 

Foreign Language

This course develops student’s knowledge of Latin and teaches students to read Latin texts. Students also study Roman culture and its impact on today’s society. Eighth Grade Latin continues to improve students’ English, build their vocabulary, and prepare them for high school Latin.

Latin I provides a solid foundation in basic Latin grammar. It is an intensive introductory course to Classical Latin that enables students to analyze the basic rules of syntactic and morphological structure needed to translate basic Latin Texts into English and English Texts into Latin. By the end of the first year, familiarization with the structure of the language will be established. Additionally, the course explores various aspects of ancient Roman life, including the founding of the empire, government arts, morality, and Roman satire.

Prerequisite: B or better in Latin I and/or Instructor’s Approval.

 

Honors Latin II solidifies the basic concepts of Latin grammar and requires the translation of small passages from ancient authors (Cicero, Caesar, Pliny). In the cultural readings, many facts already acquired in other classes will be enhanced with more historic details leading to the realization that many modern insights are actually derived from ancient Roman views.  Honors Latin II will again focus on the acquisition of linguistic skills. A certain amount of memorization of vocabulary and word endings will be necessary as well as more sight translations. Additionally, the course explores various aspects of ancient Roman life, including the founding of the empire, government arts, morality, and Roman satire.

Prerequisite: B or better in Latin II and/or Instructor’s Approval.

Honors Latin III completes the students understanding of the Latin grammar and requires the translation of large passages from ancient authors (Cicero, Caesar, Pliny). Honors Latin III will again focus on the acquisition of linguistic skills and the application of understanding how the Latin language works. A certain amount of memorization of vocabulary and word endings will be necessary as well as more sight translations. Additionally, the course explores various aspects of ancient Roman life, including the founding of the empire, government arts, morality, and Roman satire.

Prerequisite: B or better in Latin III and/or Instructor’s Approval.

 

Honors Latin IV focuses around selections from Julius Caesar’s Commentaries on the Gallic Wars read in Latin. Students will explore the role that Caesar’s successes and well-managed failures in Gaul had in Caesar’s meteoric rise to power as dictator for life and–consequently–to the fall of the Republic.

 

Prerequisite: B or better in Honors Latin courses and/or Instructor’s Approval.

The AP Latin course focuses on the in-depth study of selections from two of the greatest works in Latin literature: Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s Gallic War. The course requires students to prepare and translate the readings and place these texts in a meaningful context, which helps develop critical, historical, and literary sensitivities. Throughout the course, students consider themes in the context of ancient literature and bring these works to life through classroom discussions, debates, and presentations. Additional English readings from both of these works help place the Latin readings in a significant context.

 

Spanish I aims to build basic grammatical and syntactical rules.  The course will include listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the target language.  Another main component of the course is to explore the traditions and customs of Spanish-speaking communities around the world.

 

Prerequisite:  Completion of Spanish I with a C or better.

 

Spanish II builds on the basic grammatical and syntactical rules learned in Spanish I while exploring new key concepts.  Although there is a large focus on grammatical constructions, the overall ongoing goal is language acquisition.  The course will continue to explore traditions and customs of Spanish-speaking communities around the world.

Prerequisite:  Completion of Spanish II with a C+ or better.

 

Spanish III continues to use previous concepts from Spanish I and II.  The vocabulary, culture and grammar learned in the previous courses will be used to express ideas in increasingly complex sentence structure in a variety of social settings.  This will be accomplished by analyzing different Spanish texts and readings.  The course will continue to explore traditions and customs of Spanish-speaking communities around the world.

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish III with a C or better.

Spanish IV is a complete study of the language with emphasis on acquiring oral and writing fluency. The cultural readings used in the previous course will be used to build upon that information to express ideas in a more complex setting to start writing a variety of essays in a deeper level. Fluency in conversational Spanish is practiced.  This course is an intense preparation for college level language studies, conducted mostly in Spanish. Mastery of the four communication skills of the language will be practiced, which include listening, speaking, reading and writing, will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: B or better in prior year Spanish courses and/or Instructor’s Approval.

 

The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational skills in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught almost exclusively in Spanish. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural products (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).

Visual and Performing Arts

Note: These courses are for high school students only.

Art I focuses on developing fundamental skills in drawing, composition and painting in various mediums. Students will also consider art criticism and aesthetics for a well-rounded introduction to the visual arts.

This course is designed for the student who would like to further study in the principles of art and design introduced in Art I.  Assigned projects are more open-ended, with parameters set by the instructor but interpretation open to the student.  Students will participate in peer critique and self –assessment. This is an intermediate course for those interested in advancing to the AP Studio Portfolio.

This is a foundational course on the principles of art as they apply to modeling in three dimensions.  Topics include additive and subtractive sculpture, architectural design, and modeling in plaster and clay.

Pre-requisite: Grade of B or higher in previous English and History courses and Instructor’s approval.

Students will examine the process and principles of global art history from pre-historic times to the present. In-depth study of major works of art, architecture, and sculpture will provide unique insight into a variety of cultures and time periods. The course will follow AP guidelines and prepare the student for the AP Art History Exam.

Pre-requisites: B or better in Art 1, Drawing and Painting and Instructor’s approval.

The focus of the course is on a student-created portfolio of work in a variety of drawing and painting mediums, including concentration on a specific theme. This class is specifically designed for the student to submit his/her portfolio of twenty-four works to the College Board for evaluation (AP Exam).

This course is an introduction to drama including appropriate theatre terminology for stage, voice, movement, improvisation, acting, directing, technical aspects of production, historical theatre, and theatrical careers.  The study of drama will be approached through study of text, active participation in projects, research, discussion, interaction with professionals in the field, and classroom and public performance.

Prerequisite: Audition required

 

The philosophy of the Advanced Drama curriculum is to foster a student centered learning environment which allows students to gain and use knowledge and skills of acting, dance, and voice.  Its primary goal is to address the developmental nature of each learner, promote critical thinking skills, foster communication and make connections across the curriculum while infusing real life applications to develop students who are lifelong learners. Students will create characters for theatrical productions through scene, character, and technical analysis. Through improvisation, script writing, and aesthetic creation and collaboration, actors will refine their working knowledge and independent thought, articulating and justifying their creative choices. Students’ “critical eye” becomes more developed and significant mastery of artistic choices becomes evident. An inquiry-based capstone project will be required. Public performances will also serve as a culmination of specific instructional goals. Students will be required to participate in rehearsals and performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom. 

 

Honors Theatre is a repeatable elective, which concerns itself with upper level exploration of the nature and manner of the Dramatic Arts in both its historical and contemporary manifestations. To this end, students are expected to develop a working historical knowledge of the major developmental patterns of theatre, film and other applicable disciplines. Students are also expected to learn how to read a script, analyze its thematic structures, discern metaphoric patterns, understand the use of classically understood symbols, and create a production concept which accurately reflects these things.  In addition, this course allows students who have proven their aptitude for the Dramatic Arts the opportunity to create theatre in a professional environment.  Students will collaborate to create weekly performance projects.  Throughout this course students will perform three full-length productions.

 

This course is an exploration of how various musical theatre forms from a variety of cultures and genres contributed to the creation of one of the most complex and quintessentially American forms of art—the American Musical Theatre.  Students will examine how musical theatre has reflected and contributed to the social fabric and culture of the United States from the 17th through the 21st centuries. Themes to be discussed include gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity, and reflections of America that musicals have conveyed. The course will identify and discuss the contributions of the major artists who have made a significant impact on the development of the American musical theatre. Students will not only study about the musical but experience firsthand the world of the musical performer. In addition, this course will provide coaching, information and expertise designed for the improvement of each student’s vocal preparation, audition skills and performance. 

 

Prerequisite: Instructor’s Approval or Theory Assessment (see Instructor for details)

 

This advanced-level music theory course develops a student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the materials and processes of music, including musical terminology, notational skills, composition skills, musical analysis, and aural skills.

The Concert Choir (grades 9 through 12) is a beginner mixed-voice performing choir which studies and performs vocal music from many eras, genres, and countries in three or more parts.  Instruction includes elements of music theory, vocal technique, choral performance, and music history.  Participation in at least four public concerts and/or festivals is required for this course.

 

Prerequisite: Audition required

 

The Chamber Singers is an advanced mixed-voice performing choir which studies and performs vocal music from many eras, genres, and countries in four or more parts.  Instruction includes elements of music theory, vocal technique, choral performance, and music history.  Participation in TPS concerts, assemblies, special events, and several off-campus festivals and/or competitions is required for this course. 

Guitar Orchestra is open to all students in grades 9 through 12 with no prior experience necessary.  Students will learn classical fingerpicking guitar technique and how to read written music for guitar.  The class will perform in concerts as a group. 

The Music Appreciation class studies the history of music as a timeline.  Each unit (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, 20th Century, Contemporary) focuses on important composers, musical works, concepts, and technological advances of the era. Students will also receive instruction in basic music theory and notation.  No prior experience in music is needed for this class.

7th & 8th Grade Electives

PE 7/8 is an engaging, cooperative course based on the Physical Education standards.  Grades are given for participation and social skills.  The grading system consists of 5 points per day (3-points participation, 2-points social skills). On block schedule days, students will earn up to 10 points per class period.  The class will include activities and sports that are presented in a comfortable, non-competitive environment.  The goals are to improve physical skills, fitness levels, and social development. 

 

Note: All 7th graders will take the CA physical fitness test.

This course is designed to introduce formal logic to 7th graders.  Students will exercise syllogisms and inference to strengthen their ability to evaluate the validity of an argument.  Additionally, students will explore the nature of logic, with an emphasis on logical inquiry as a rational, and therefore, uniquely human pursuit. 

This class offers an opportunity to explore the world of art and creativity. The focus will be on drawing and painting, as well as exploring a variety of projects that challenge the imagination and lead to an understanding and appreciation of the expressive possibilities of art.

 

Prerequisite – students must be elected or appointed by the student body into their respective positions.

 

The ASB represents the entire TPS student body.  This course focuses on the skills necessary to become effective leaders both on campus and in their own community. The course will enhance leadership and organizational skills through exploration of what it means to be an effective group member and leader through planning and implementing activities, programs, and events for TPS students and faculty.   Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA.

 

This course is designed to give an introduction to drama including appropriate theatre terminology for stage, voice, movement, improvisation, acting, directing, technical aspects of production, historical theatre, and theatrical careers. The study of drama will be approached through study of text, active participation in projects, research, class discussion, interaction with professionals in the field, and classroom and public performance.

Health Education/Recreational Arts is a course designed to provide each student with the skills necessary to live the healthiest life possible.  The importance of balancing all aspects of life to achieve overall wellness will be a focus.  Classroom discussions are very prevalent and occur daily pertaining to the topic being covered.  The main goal of this class is to provide students with a solid foundation of concepts and skills that will enable them to live a physically and mentally healthy active lifestyle.

The Junior Choir (grades 7 and 8) is a beginner mixed-voice performing choir which studies and performs vocal music from many eras, genres, and countries in two or more parts.  Instruction includes elements of music theory, vocal technique, choral performance and music history.  Participation in at least four public concerts or festivals is required for this course.

 

Prerequisite – Instructor Approval Only

 

The Music Appreciation class studies the history of music as a timeline.  Each unit (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, 20th Century, Contemporary) focuses on important composers, musical works, concepts, and technological advances of the era. Students will also receive instruction in basic music theory and notation.  No prior experience in music is needed for this class.

This course is an exploration of the birth of the American Musical.  Students will explore musical theatre history and how this art form addressed a variety of issues in our culture as it developed. The course will identify and discuss the contributions of the major artists who have made a significant impact on the development of the American musical theatre. Students will not only study about the musical but experience firsthand the world of the musical performer. In addition, this course will provide coaching, information and expertise designed for the improvement of each student’s vocal preparation, audition skills and performance. Students in this class are expected to sing, on their own, with a partner, and in a group. 

High School Electives

Note: Additional years beyond the UC/CSU requirements of visual/performing arts, history, advanced math, lab science, and foreign language can be used for college prep elective credits.

The following courses are approved as college prep electives.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9th and 10th grade English course with B- or higher.

 

The Advanced Placement Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with the course objectives.  Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas. 

Prerequisite: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 only a B or higher in the prior year English course.

 

AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives.  Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and philosophical tests; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances.  Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team.  Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

 

Prerequisite: Open to students in grades 11 and 12 who have completed AP Seminar.

 

AP Research allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research based investigation to address a research question. In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4000–5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.

Prerequisite: Students must be elected or appointed by the student body into their respective positions.

 

The ASB represents the entire TPS student body.  This course focuses on the skills necessary to become effective leaders both on campus and in their own community.  The course will enhance leadership and organizational skills through exploration of what it means to be an effective group member and leader through planning and implementing activities, programs, and events for TPS students and faculty.  Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA in order to remain in the course.

Yearbook focuses on the design and creation of the cover, end sheets, theme, and layout of the yearbook. Instruction will be given for use of cameras and photographic techniques, on managing deadlines, on marketing the yearbook, and on learning journalistic style. The class will also produce news articles throughout the year.

 

Moral Philosophy is the branch of philosophy dealing with both argument about the content of morality and meta-ethical discussion of the nature of moral judgment, language, argument, and value.  It seeks to determine the correct application of moral notions such as good and bad and right and wrong or a theory of the application or the nature of such notions.  Moral philosophy is the area of philosophy concerned with theories of ethics, with how we ought to live our lives. It is divided into three areas: meta-ethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics.  This course will address all three levels while at the same time allowing students to apply these notions to everyday issues.

Prerequisite: Meeting with advisor.

 

Peer Leaders is a self-development leadership course with a focus on improving school climate. This class will work towards self-awareness, effective communication, and community engagement through a student-centered collaborative environment. In addition to this, students in this course will participate in Peer Leaders Uniting Students (PLUS). PLUS is a nationally recognized model focused on student engagement and empowerment. PLUS trains students to facilitate forums for peers, to collect quantitative and qualitative data, to analyze said data, and to be active agents of change.

This course requires students to review the history of psychology and research psychology as a profession while discussing the different methods that psychologists use to study issues and explore some of the problems in conducting research. Students look into problems and solutions in research and statistical evaluation. Students further their knowledge by examining developmental psychology from adolescence to adulthood, biological processes as connected to behavioral and psychological processes, the mental process, how motivation and emotion influence behaviors, the study of psychological disorders and psychotherapy, and social psychology.

The following courses are not approved for college prep electives; these courses are for high school elective credit only.

Prerequisite: Completed Permission Form and Counselor Approval.

 

Academic Seminar serves a variety of purposes for students.  A student can receive one-on-one enrichment and support for their core curriculum classes in a flexible seating environment.  Students can utilize the period completing independently-paced online credit recovery courses through Plato Edmentum, a virtual learning program designed to promote and drive academic success. Students can also review and refine executive functioning skills through guided practice and instruction.  With approval from the Dean, qualifying students are able to complete college courses online through Mount San Jacinto College, earning both high school and college credit. 

Prerequisites: Previous letter in a varsity sport or Athletic Director approval.

 

This course includes free weights, plyometrics, personal goal-setting, and strength training. 

 

Health Education, in accordance with state guidelines, is designed to provide each student with the necessary skills to live the healthiest life possible. Every student receives instruction which includes values clarification, acceptance of personal responsibility, respect for each other, promotion of personal health and health of others, critical thinking skills, and an informal use of health related information, products, and services. Exercise, exercise physiology, substance use and abuse, nutrition, accident and emergency procedures, family life, sex education, parenting skills, sexual harassment, prejudice, infectious disease and other health issues are included in this course. 

Positions are available to students in grades 11-12 and require approval. Student must complete the Teacher Aide Application and return it to the counseling office.

The Physical Education class fulfills the California State P.E. standards, as well as provides for a solid base for exploration in the related areas of kinesiology (study of movement), and exercise and nutritional science.  The class is a college preparatory class that evaluates the academic as well as athletic elements of P.E. that also relates to other subjects across the curriculum.  The course is based on 5 primary components: 1) healthy zone activities, 2) fitness, strength, and flexibility, 3) cardiovascular health, 4) strategies and skills of team and individual sports, and 5) the principles of conditioning as they related to kinesiology and exercise science.  Goal setting and sportsmanship, along with the “four virtues” are embraced in physical education, which allows for a logical carry over from the classroom to the playing field.

 

Note: All 9th graders, regardless of enrollment in the course, will take the CA physical fitness test.

This class is dedicated to helping 12th grade students create the best college applications possible and preparing students for the transition to college. Students will have time to research colleges, explore majors and careers, fill out applications, perfect personal statements, and find scholarships to pay for college. The second half of the course will focus on college survival and cover topics like: handling roommates, time management, study skills, and personal finance.  

Positions are available to students in grades 11-12 and require approval. Student must complete the Teacher Aide Application and return it to the counseling office

Planning Ahead

When selecting courses for high school, refer to the requirements below to be sure you are on track for either the proficient or advanced diploma.

Graduation Requirements:

                                                                               Credits Required

                                                            Proficient                              Advanced

History/Social Science                          40                                       40

English                                                      40                                       40

Mathematics                                           30                                       40

Lab Science                                             30                                       30

Foreign Language                                   20                                       30

Latin                                                          10                                       20

Visual/Performing Arts                          10                                       10

Electives                                                    35                                       35    

Total Credits Required for Graduation:                        

                                                                  215                                        245

Additional Graduation Requirements:

Senior Thesis                                                      Complete Algebra I

60 Hours of Community Service                     Moral Philosophy (12th Grade)